Research by Huddersfield students is accessible and citeable

Fields: Journal of Huddersfield Student Research is now in its fourth year and the call for potential authors is out and currently staff are busy identifying excellent academic work. If you are a student and wondering how to submit check out the details on the University Press webpages.

The journal articles in Fields are in the University repository so it is possible to monitor the number of downloads. Looking at the download numbers for the three current volumes it is clear there appears to be ongoing interest the research carried out by the students.

The third volume of Fields was published in February 2017 with 12 papers from across the seven Schools and has had more than 700 downloads since published.

For such a new journal the readership has grown very fast and download statistics continue to increase.

Another way of gauging the impact of the articles published in Fields is to explore how they feature in, for example, Google Scholar Citations. The University Press Manager, Megan Taylor, has looked at this and found that three of the journal article from the first volume of Fields are listed in Google scholar as being cited by other research.

One of these citations is in a dissertation written in the US and another in a dissertation from a Czech University. The third article is cited in the journal Innovative Practice in Higher Education, a journal for higher education practitioners with an interest in the development of the HE student experience. The three cited articles are:

It is really encouraging to see the student research making its way into the wider world and being cited in a variety of scholarly outputs.

And if you want to hear more from the Fields’ authors then take a look at these posts:

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Assessment for learning: a shared responsibility

In 2016, Professor Christine Jarvis, the Pro Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning made funds available for teaching and learning development projects that could make an impact on teaching, learning and assessment. As a result, the seven schools at the University of Huddersfield are running a number of projects and we are sharing some of the project progress and outcomes here on the Teaching and Learning Institute blog.

CC0 Public Domain

The School of Education and Professional Development has a project which focuses on Assessment for Learning and aims to improve assessment practices across the undergraduate courses and the wider school. In this post, Dr Liz Bennett and Dr Kate Lavender talk about developing their understanding of what students’ views of assessment, how to better support student assessment literacy and the creation of some Principles of Assessment for Learning that position assessment practices as a shared responsibility.

Student satisfaction with assessment

Assessment is the area that scores least well in the National Student Survey (NSS). This is true nationally but is also true for the University of Huddersfield (although we are doing significantly better than rest of the sector however clearly we must not be complacent). In addition, we know that students’ attainment has a significant impact on their self-esteem which in turn impacts on retention (Bluicet al., 2011). Finding ways to develop students’ satisfaction with assessment was one of the drivers for a school based project focusing on Assessment for Learning. We analysed data was from the 2016 NSS qualitative comments and identified issues relating to:

  • Fairness
  • Assessment literacy
  • Feedback

Typical comments were:

Fairness

“tutors expect different things”

“As a student with responsibilities out of university I personally have not asked for 1 extension when struggling with meeting deadlines as I view this as a last resort. However certain individuals are being granted extensions for deadlines for petty reasons.”

Assessment Literacy

“it’s hard to reach the top, not a lot of support.”

“I haven’t given clear, detailed instructions about how to carry out an assignment”

“They could have explained the grading criteria in more detail, which would have helped students to pick up marks on the assignments.”

Feedback

“Given very limited feedback on the formative which leaves students feeling disappointed with the summative results due to this.”

“feedback that I got for formative was really poor with just words and I don’t know how I am supposed to improve my work.”

“Feedback on some modules did not match the grade. Example: on the assignment was written good points such as excellent work, good work but grade did not match”

“The feedback received isn’t detail enough for my liking.”

Assessment literacy

Qualitative data was also collected for the project in the form of focus groups with students in the school which has helped to contextualize the NSS data to inform our understanding of students’ comments as, in part, a failure in relation to students’ understanding of assessment literacy. Assessment literacy is defined as students’ understanding of the purpose and process of assessment (why they are being assessed, what they need to do in order to succeed, and how the assessment contributes to their overall understanding of the subject (after Price et al 2012; Forsyth et al 2015; Evans 2016). SEPD lecturers already use many of the tools for developing students’ assessment literacy including:

  • engaging students with assessment criteria by involving them in:
    • assessing each other’s work,
    • refining criteria to align with requirements of a specific assessment task;
    • using rubrics with clearly defined marking criteria to explain the grade given;
  • supporting students to understand the assessment task through clear explanations and support provided in range of forms (detailed assignment briefs, tutorials).

The project is focusing on ways that we can develop students’ understanding of assessment and feedback including their ability to act on feedback. We have been informed by Evans (2013) work on students’ self-regulation and Bartimote-Aufflick et al.’s (2015) work on self-efficacy in assessment practices (also Cowan 2015, Forsyth 2015).

We see this move to focus on developing students’ self-regulatory behaviours as a significant shift in the way that we improve our assessment practices; moving the responsibility from lecturers/the school towards a shared responsibility.

Principles of Assessment for Learning

We have developed some SEPD Principles of Assessment for Learning drawing on Evans (2016) work. We have also identified some resources for developing students’ ability to understand, interpret and act on feedback produced by the Higher Education Academy (Winstone & Nash 2016) which have started to discuss with Course Leaders.

We argue that by improving students’ understanding of assessment literacy and their self-regulatory behaviours should help to manage their expectations. We also argue that students need this high degree of assessment literacy to understand their role in assessment and how assessment operates. This will, we believe, deepen students’ understanding and enable them to engage more meaningfully with the NSS questions and thus help to develop the validity of the NSS survey results from our students. We also believe that it will help us to work with our students as partners in the learning process and this in turn will support students’ self-esteem and thus aid retention.

References

Bartimote-Aufflick, K., Bridgeman, A., Walker, R., Sharma, M., & Smith, L. (2015). The study, evaluation, and improvement of university student self-efficacy. Studies in Higher Education, 41(11), 1918-1942. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2014.999319

Bliuc, A-M., Ellis, R.A., Goodyear, P., & Hendres, D. M. (2011). Understanding student learning in context: Relationships between university students’ social identity, approaches to learning, and academic performance. European Journal of Psychology Education, 26, 417-433. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10212-011-0065-6

Cowan, J. (2015). Promoting self-efficacy through affective feedback and feedforward. Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education, 9. http://www.aldinhe.ac.uk/ojs/index.php?journal=jldhe&page=article&op=view&path%5B%5D=313

Evans, C. (2013). Making Sense of Assessment Feedback in Higher Education. Review of Educational Research, 83(1), 70-120. http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0034654312474350

Forsyth, R., Cullen, R., Ringan, N., & Stubbs, M. (2015). Supporting the development of assessment literacy of staff through institutional process change. London Review of Education, 13(2), 34-42.  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ioep/clre/2015/00000013/00000003/art00005

Price, M., Rust, C., O’Donovan, B., Handley, K., and Bryant, R. (2012) Assessment Literacy: The foundation for improving student learning. Oxford: ASKe, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development.

Winstone, N. E., & Nash, R. A. (2016). The Developing Engagement with Feedback Toolkit (DEFT) Retrieved from HEA: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resource/developing-engagement-feedback-toolkit-deft

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Improving UG Student Achievement and Satisfaction through understanding Assessment Criteria

In 2016, Professor Christine Jarvis, the Pro Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning made funds available for teaching and learning development projects that could make an impact on teaching, learning and assessment. As a result, the seven schools at the University of Huddersfield are running a number of projects and we are sharing some of the project progress and outcomes here on the Teaching and Learning Institute blog.

In The Business School they are running a project to improve student attainment by developing students’ engagement with assessment criteria. In this post, Wilma Teviotdale and Karen Mountain talks about developing targeted module level interventions as a way to develop assessment criteria knowledge.

Developing meaningful tutor-student dialogue about assessment

There is some experience of the use of past marked student work in the School to help students understand what is required but this is not commonly done, nor necessarily done in a manner which supports students’ direct engagement with assessment criteria.

A series of focused teaching interventions at undergraduate (UG) honours module level from major courses has been undertaken, identifying modules where student achievement is below cohort average and courses with low firsts and upper seconds outcome projected.

Discussions were then held with course leaders (CL) and module leaders (ML) to explore how they are currently supporting student understanding of the various types of assessment used in order to develop an intervention tailored to each module.  The agreed teaching intervention developed meaningful academic tutor-student dialogue using exemplars from past marked student work as the vehicle for the intervention, supporting formative assessment in each module.  The timing of the interventions depended on the points of summative assessments in each module. Although the focus of the intervention was at module level, the understanding of assessment criteria being developed is expected to be a transferable skill across students’ other modules. This will support academic tutor-student dialogue more widely.

The exact nature of each intervention was the subject of negotiation between the project lead, UG CL and ML.  The School’s International Student Support tutors received the material to provide additional support for overseas students with this targeted intervention in their English language classes, which is timetabled into courses.

Feedback from students on this process was captured through short questionnaires. The results from the completed student surveys (captured immediately after the exercise in class) have been summarised and feedback so far indicate that the results are very positive from the students’ perspective:

  • Increased confidence after the session (see Fig 1)
  • Discussions around the criteria were helpful
  • 92 % said they had a better understanding of tutor expectations

Figure 1: Students level of confidence

Bar chart showing the levels of confidence students reported pre - and post session

The main problem highlighted was the lack of time to complete the exercise – that would need addressing in the future, through embedding the work in module handbook schedules and making this part of the School’s Teaching and Learning strategy document.

Interviews have been recorded with module leaders and tutors involved in the classes to date. The feedback is in the process of being coded and analysed, but initial impressions show a range of perceptions and experiences and we are working on why some are very good and others not well received by staff. Student focus groups and comparison of module results is also still to be undertaken.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Inspiring Student Engagement with Team-Based Learning

In 2016, Professor Christine Jarvis, the Pro Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning made funds available for teaching and learning development projects that could make an impact on teaching, learning and assessment. As a result, the seven schools at the University of Huddersfield are running a number of projects and we are sharing some of the project progress and outcomes here on the Teaching and Learning Institute blog.

In the School of Human and Health Sciences they are running a project to implement Team-Based Learning (TBL) within their inter-professional research modules. In this post, Dr Christine Dearnley talks about the work involved in implementing TBL and how students have been recruited to act as ‘change agents’ liaising between students and staff in the development, implementation and evaluation of the project.

Developing engaging learning processes
There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that traditional approaches to delivering Higher Education are no longer appropriate for the students we have and the outcomes we require and expect of them. Students are increasingly ‘tuned into’ social media with its immediacy, vibrancy, colours and tunes; not to mention the social and collaborative influences on their decision making and life choices. In contrast, traditional approaches to learning and teaching, such as lectures and solitary reading and thinking processes, lack the appeal of these new rivals and frequently fail to engage students at level required for substantive learning.

Similarly, the expectations of the learning processes in terms of the graduates who exit from our courses has also changed. We need and expect our graduates to be equipped with the skills of independent thinking, to be confident in their own abilities for problem solving and leading change. The challenge for educators of health care students is therefore to deliver a curriculum in which our students can thrive, to create an environment that nurtures confidence and growth and respects individuality and diversity. Students must learn to hear their own voices and know what they know.

The transformational impact of team-based learning 
Against this background there is a tentative, though growing body of evidence to support team-based learning (TBL) as a transformative teaching and learning strategy that can impact on student engagement, student satisfaction, attainment and practice development. TBL is an instructional strategy that is increasingly being used in medical and pharmacy education; there are also reports in the literature of successful use in education for other health care professions, such as midwifery, nursing and optometry.

In the School of Human and Health Sciences we are therefore running a project to implement TBL within our inter-professional research modules. These modules are studied by students on all our undergraduate health care courses, learning together so that they can work together more effectively in professional practice. This means that over 800 students will be involved in this transformational learning project, they include 1st and 2nd year students from the following courses: BSc (Hons) Podiatry; BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy; BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy; BSc (Hons) Midwifery Studies; BSc (Hons) Nursing & BSc (Hons) Operating Department Practice.Diagram showing the three step cycle of team-based learning

TBL is a collaborative learning and teaching strategy designed around units of instruction that are taught in a three-step cycle: preparation (individual study), readiness assurance testing (multiple choice questions to check on knowledge and understanding – both individually and in then in teams) followed by team activities that support application of new knowledge and concepts to real life practice scenarios. To date, almost 40 staff from within the school have been engaged in workshops to inform them about the TBL processes and how to develop the required materials and deliver them using this very clearly defined and structured process. The project has included the recruitment of student consultants to act as ‘change agents’. Their role is to bring the student voice to the proposed changes and to liaise between students and staff in the development, implementation and evaluation of the project. Student change agents provide additional capacity and insights into the student experience, which is often greatly different from that of staff. Their role is flexible and evolving as the project progresses; ensuring that opportunities for a variety of skills to develop are optimised.

The project has presented challenges as expected with any large scale transformation. Yet there is an air of optimism among staff and student consultants that this will make a difference to the student experience. Some staff have commented on this being the most exciting element of their jobs at the moment and student consultants have commented that this is going to be “so much better.” There is still much to do, but we are making good progress and all being well we will be using TBL to deliver these modules with effect from 2017. Wish us luck!

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Creating online resources to develop student information search skills

In 2016, Professor Christine Jarvis, the Pro Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning made funds available for teaching and learning development projects that could make an impact on teaching, learning and assessment. As a result, the seven schools at the University of Huddersfield are running a number of projects and we are sharing some of the project progress and outcomes here on the Teaching and Learning Institute blog.

In the School of Education and Professional Development, a project on embedding critical writing into undergraduate courses was developed. This blog post was written by Jess Haigh, Subject Librarian at the University of Huddersfield who is part of the project team. In this post Jess presents her experiences with carrying out a pilot to create a resource to develop students’ resource searching skills.

Developing an online resource for resource searching skills

As part of the larger project, it was decided to create an educational resource that could be used in the classroom, or uploaded onto the VLE to be completed outside class time, which would have the learning outcomes of differentiating between keywords and non-keywords, demonstrate use of synonyms in context in searching and use these search skills to find more appropriate academic sources. I wanted students to feel more confident about searching the library catalogue. I was also interested in if and how they currently looking for help in searching library resources.

I developed an online resource using NearPod. http://www.NearPod.com is a platform for creating resources than can be either student or teacher led. Different licences allow you to do different things, but for a free trial I was able to create a series of activities that I predicted would take students around 10-15 minutes to complete on their own, including watching two short videos. These included drawing, filling in the blanks, and free typing activities. I found setting up this series of activities quite simple and the whole thing from start to finish took less than a working day. I also made the two videos using VideoScribe and Adobe Spark Video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLcUV3SYuH0 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RX2J1KXUs8A ).

I piloted this resource with a group of second year students. The students were fully informed about the purpose of the pilot, and signed consent forms. This was quite a useful exercise in and of itself, as they are about to go into planning research of their own for their Major Study, so I was able to demonstrate good ethical research practice to them. Students filled in a questionnaire including sliding scale questions on how confident they felt about searching the library catalogue and the internet, and open-ended questions about what they interpreted key words, synonyms and related terms as being, and if and how they would ask for help in the library. Students were then given as much time as needed to complete the NearPod exercises, using their own devices. Some students took less than ten minutes, but others took twenty-five, showing my original estimation of how long it would take to complete did not account for differentiation. I also observed some peer learning occurring throughout the exercises: it would be interesting to observe if that took place outside of a classroom environment. Students were then asked to fill in a second questionnaire identical to the first, to measure their learning, and to fill in some open-ended questions regarding their feelings towards the resource.

Enhancing student confidence in searching for information

Attitudes towards the resource itself were mostly positive, with students finding it “informative”, “helpful” and “useful”. There was only one negative response to the task, a student who felt it had not been worth coming to that class as they had done key word searching in their first year. The majority of students also felt more confident in searching the library catalogue after completing the resource, with 46% also feeling more confident in searching for information on the Internet.

What I found most interesting was students’ attitude to online learning. 44% said they would not have completed the task if it had been put on UniLearn, and 46% said they probably wouldn’t, with several citing a lack of time as their reason. It made me wonder how much effort is being put into creating online resources that will never be used by time-poor students who only go into learning spaces to complete specific tasks.

I will be looking further into these results, and adapting the resource according to some specific feedback. This will all feed into the larger project to encourage tutors to include exercises on finding good resources in class. I am also presenting on this project at the Librarian’s Information Literacy Annual Conference in April.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Dr Jess Power: 2016 National Teaching Fellow

Picture: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian Staff at the University of Huddersfield. PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Picture: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian
Staff at the University of Huddersfield.
PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Over the last six years, the Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI) has coordinated the University of Huddersfield’s internal National Teaching Fellowship selection process. We have worked closely with the Pro-Vice Chancellor of Teaching and Learning and a selection committee to identify and support colleagues to apply for National Teaching Fellowship Awards. The Higher Education Academy (HEA) in December announced that two colleagues were awarded National Teaching Fellowships.

In 2016 Dr Jess Power, Director of Teaching and Learning in the School of Art, Design and Architecture was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship. Jess is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, Member of the Chartered Management Institute and a Trustee of the Textile Institute. Her core discipline area is textiles/apparel and the main body of her research focuses around active learning for large cohorts of apparel/textile students. Jess has developed strategies which have led to a real impact on students learning by creating best practice models using active learning techniques and introducing approaches such as peer-learning and team-teaching.

Since joining the University in 2012 Jess has led a number of initiatives to transform the under-graduate student experience by embedding collaboration both within and out of the curriculum. Primarily focusing on encouraging students to work across and beyond disciplines to encourage the co-creation of knowledge and the development of networks. This has led to students broadening their interests and ambitions and improving skills relevant to industry, enterprise and employability.

Jess says:

“Throughout my teaching career I have aimed to find the right blend of surroundings and pedagogical theories to create supportive environments which bring together students and staff, from many disciplines, to engage in creating sustainable learning networks across Higher Education, commercial sectors and Professional Bodies.”

Interdisciplinarity projects: Honeypot and ICE

ICE, which stands for Innovation and Creative Exchange is a series of lectures, workshops, networking events and skill exchanges which is aimed at fostering collaboration between design and engineering students – the next generation of employees for UK knowledge based industries.

The aim is to bring the best of innovative design and industry thinking into the undergraduate curriculum and to embed the latest innovation and design methodologies. Events include design challenges, industrial briefs and visits from high-profile professionals; with a key focus of providing interdisciplinarity opportunities to work on real-world challenges such as the 24-hour challenges on ‘sustainable solutions to global challenges’, the ‘ageing population’ and the ‘internet of things’. The impact of ICE has been demonstrated through companies recruiting students, through further research projects, and five discipline-hopping interns (engineering student placed in a design company and vice-versa).

Through this structures Jess has created interdisciplinarity which has become firmly established; resulting in the showcasing and sharing of School-based resources and the further development of interdisciplinarity challenges and networking opportunities across the entire University. One of the outputs of this project was an Industry award-winning product design which has been further developed by an industrial partner. 

Technology focused initiatives

Jess has been involved in investigating Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) usage within the creative arts in a collaborative project between the School of Art, Design and Architecture and Music, Humanities and Media. The research showed that the VLE was integrated less into practice-based subjects with three main barriers being identified; technical ability, navigation and aesthetics.

As a result of this research a framework was developed and implemented which promoted a blended approach to integrating the VLE into creative practice, specifically targeting navigation, aesthetics and digital literacy. The impact on both the student and staff experience was evident and subsequently, engagement with the VLE in creative arts has risen dramatically.

Jess also initiated a technician-led Teaching and Learning enhancement week which showcased the innovative technology available within the School and opened up these facilities for collaborative research and T&L projects. This has resulted in the School overcoming many technology-based restrictions and has had far-reaching benefits for students’ learning and the continuing professional development of staff.

For more information about National Teaching Fellows at the University of Huddersfield, see the Teaching and Learning Institute’s web page.

The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Dr Jane Tobbell: 2016 National Teaching Fellow

Picture: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian Staff at the University of Huddersfield. PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Photo: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian
PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Over the last six years, the Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI) has coordinated the University of Huddersfield’s internal National Teaching Fellowship selection process. We have worked closely with the Pro-Vice Chancellor of Teaching and Learning and a selection committee to identify and support colleagues to apply for National Teaching Fellowship Awards.

The Higher Education Academy (HEA) in December announced that two colleagues were awarded National Teaching Fellowships. Dr Jess Power and Dr Jane Tobbell are two of the 55 recipients of the 2016 National Teaching Fellowships. You can learn more about the 2016 National Teaching Fellows on the HEA NTF 2016 pages.  

This post highlights some of the work of one of the successful candidates, Dr Jane Tobbell. Dr Tobbell teaches and researches in the discipline of psychology and has worked at the University of Huddersfield since 2006. Jane became a University Teaching Fellow in 2013, a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2014 and leads a number of innovative teaching and learning projects. These include an exploration of inclusion/learning environments, peer mentoring, developing an integrated assessment and feedback policy for her School and her research in teaching and learning around transition.

Jane considers that excellence in teaching and learning emerges through interaction between students and teachers, where both are allowed to contribute to a mutually engaging learning relationship. She puts down the success of her approach to her focus on forging enabling learning relationships which allow students to rehearse and perfect academic practices and gives them confidence to perform to the best of their ability.

Working in partnership with students
Jane is currently working with student researchers to investigate what inclusion means to students. One approach was to harness the collective wisdom of existing students to help new students. The project involved placing white boards in common areas in the School and students are invited to offer advice to new students. This project has provided space for the student voice and has resulted in a range of advice from tips on budgeting to how to engage with the library. Over 100 students contributed their advice and this has been disseminated across the School. The participation of so many students enables the collection of data which will represent everybody in the School and so allow a depth and breadth of understanding of what it means to be included which will inform meaningful policy and procedures in the School

Jane is the University lead in implementing peer mentoring programmes for all students. Peer mentoring promotes partnership between students and staff and enhances learning relationships because it enables interaction outside the formal curriculum where staff have the power of assessment. Moreover, it encourages reflection on experience in both mentors and mentees and so improves performance. As part of this, Jane has designed and led training in peer mentoring skills and in collaboration with students produced a job description and job specification for peer mentors. Students were involved in designing the training, identifying the nature of the mentor-mentee relationship and recruiting mentees. In this scheme students are given power to change the learning environment.
Jane believes excellence is enabled through supportive policy and systems and so she has created an Assessment and Feedback Manifesto. The manifesto emerged from consultation with staff and students and gathered NSS and KIS data. A major obstacle identified was ensuring staff have sufficient time to provide the feedback students need. To address this module design now requires assessment and feedback to be integrated into the module. The National Student Survey results reflect the improvements made in assessment and feedback.

Developing teaching and learning excellence
As part of giving all staff the opportunity to reflect on teaching and learning, Jane runs monthly seminars for all University staff and postgraduate students. People are invited to present their teaching and learning projects and Jane then chairs wider discussions about how the ideas might be applied in different areas. A particularly stimulating one involved the purpose and process of ‘the lecture.’ There are many forums for staff to discuss and present their research but fewer opportunities to enable the exploration of teaching and learning activity despite the prominence of this in everybody’s workloads. The seminars have been identified by the School Teaching and Learning Committee as an important part of their teaching and learning strategy to develop excellence.

Researching transition as a process
In a more recent project, she has collected longitudinal data from students over the four years of their degree course. There is very little longitudinal data currently in the literature and in partnership with colleagues from two other HEIs they are analysing these data and preparing it for dissemination. The data allow an understanding of transition and beyond to emerge. In terms of understanding student learning for example, it is clear that students require ongoing, targeted support to acquire and enact academic practices. It fundamentally challenges assumptions that transition is a period between not knowing and knowing; rather it is a process which continues throughout the degree.

For more information about National Teaching Fellows at the University of Huddersfield, see the Teaching and Learning Institute’s web page.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute. The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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