Improving UG Student Achievement and Satisfaction through understanding Assessment Criteria

In 2016, Professor Christine Jarvis, the Pro Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning made funds available for teaching and learning development projects that could make an impact on teaching, learning and assessment. As a result, the seven schools at the University of Huddersfield are running a number of projects and we are sharing some of the project progress and outcomes here on the Teaching and Learning Institute blog.

In The Business School they are running a project to improve student attainment by developing students’ engagement with assessment criteria. In this post, Wilma Teviotdale and Karen Mountain talks about developing targeted module level interventions as a way to develop assessment criteria knowledge.

Developing meaningful tutor-student dialogue about assessment

There is some experience of the use of past marked student work in the School to help students understand what is required but this is not commonly done, nor necessarily done in a manner which supports students’ direct engagement with assessment criteria.

A series of focused teaching interventions at undergraduate (UG) honours module level from major courses has been undertaken, identifying modules where student achievement is below cohort average and courses with low firsts and upper seconds outcome projected.

Discussions were then held with course leaders (CL) and module leaders (ML) to explore how they are currently supporting student understanding of the various types of assessment used in order to develop an intervention tailored to each module.  The agreed teaching intervention developed meaningful academic tutor-student dialogue using exemplars from past marked student work as the vehicle for the intervention, supporting formative assessment in each module.  The timing of the interventions depended on the points of summative assessments in each module. Although the focus of the intervention was at module level, the understanding of assessment criteria being developed is expected to be a transferable skill across students’ other modules. This will support academic tutor-student dialogue more widely.

The exact nature of each intervention was the subject of negotiation between the project lead, UG CL and ML.  The School’s International Student Support tutors received the material to provide additional support for overseas students with this targeted intervention in their English language classes, which is timetabled into courses.

Feedback from students on this process was captured through short questionnaires. The results from the completed student surveys (captured immediately after the exercise in class) have been summarised and feedback so far indicate that the results are very positive from the students’ perspective:

  • Increased confidence after the session (see Fig 1)
  • Discussions around the criteria were helpful
  • 92 % said they had a better understanding of tutor expectations

Figure 1: Students level of confidence

Bar chart showing the levels of confidence students reported pre - and post session

The main problem highlighted was the lack of time to complete the exercise – that would need addressing in the future, through embedding the work in module handbook schedules and making this part of the School’s Teaching and Learning strategy document.

Interviews have been recorded with module leaders and tutors involved in the classes to date. The feedback is in the process of being coded and analysed, but initial impressions show a range of perceptions and experiences and we are working on why some are very good and others not well received by staff. Student focus groups and comparison of module results is also still to be undertaken.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Inspiring Student Engagement with Team-Based Learning

In 2016, Professor Christine Jarvis, the Pro Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning made funds available for teaching and learning development projects that could make an impact on teaching, learning and assessment. As a result, the seven schools at the University of Huddersfield are running a number of projects and we are sharing some of the project progress and outcomes here on the Teaching and Learning Institute blog.

In the School of Human and Health Sciences they are running a project to implement Team-Based Learning (TBL) within their inter-professional research modules. In this post, Dr Christine Dearnley talks about the work involved in implementing TBL and how students have been recruited to act as ‘change agents’ liaising between students and staff in the development, implementation and evaluation of the project.

Developing engaging learning processes
There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that traditional approaches to delivering Higher Education are no longer appropriate for the students we have and the outcomes we require and expect of them. Students are increasingly ‘tuned into’ social media with its immediacy, vibrancy, colours and tunes; not to mention the social and collaborative influences on their decision making and life choices. In contrast, traditional approaches to learning and teaching, such as lectures and solitary reading and thinking processes, lack the appeal of these new rivals and frequently fail to engage students at level required for substantive learning.

Similarly, the expectations of the learning processes in terms of the graduates who exit from our courses has also changed. We need and expect our graduates to be equipped with the skills of independent thinking, to be confident in their own abilities for problem solving and leading change. The challenge for educators of health care students is therefore to deliver a curriculum in which our students can thrive, to create an environment that nurtures confidence and growth and respects individuality and diversity. Students must learn to hear their own voices and know what they know.

The transformational impact of team-based learning 
Against this background there is a tentative, though growing body of evidence to support team-based learning (TBL) as a transformative teaching and learning strategy that can impact on student engagement, student satisfaction, attainment and practice development. TBL is an instructional strategy that is increasingly being used in medical and pharmacy education; there are also reports in the literature of successful use in education for other health care professions, such as midwifery, nursing and optometry.

In the School of Human and Health Sciences we are therefore running a project to implement TBL within our inter-professional research modules. These modules are studied by students on all our undergraduate health care courses, learning together so that they can work together more effectively in professional practice. This means that over 800 students will be involved in this transformational learning project, they include 1st and 2nd year students from the following courses: BSc (Hons) Podiatry; BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy; BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy; BSc (Hons) Midwifery Studies; BSc (Hons) Nursing & BSc (Hons) Operating Department Practice.Diagram showing the three step cycle of team-based learning

TBL is a collaborative learning and teaching strategy designed around units of instruction that are taught in a three-step cycle: preparation (individual study), readiness assurance testing (multiple choice questions to check on knowledge and understanding – both individually and in then in teams) followed by team activities that support application of new knowledge and concepts to real life practice scenarios. To date, almost 40 staff from within the school have been engaged in workshops to inform them about the TBL processes and how to develop the required materials and deliver them using this very clearly defined and structured process. The project has included the recruitment of student consultants to act as ‘change agents’. Their role is to bring the student voice to the proposed changes and to liaise between students and staff in the development, implementation and evaluation of the project. Student change agents provide additional capacity and insights into the student experience, which is often greatly different from that of staff. Their role is flexible and evolving as the project progresses; ensuring that opportunities for a variety of skills to develop are optimised.

The project has presented challenges as expected with any large scale transformation. Yet there is an air of optimism among staff and student consultants that this will make a difference to the student experience. Some staff have commented on this being the most exciting element of their jobs at the moment and student consultants have commented that this is going to be “so much better.” There is still much to do, but we are making good progress and all being well we will be using TBL to deliver these modules with effect from 2017. Wish us luck!

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Creating online resources to develop student information search skills

In 2016, Professor Christine Jarvis, the Pro Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning made funds available for teaching and learning development projects that could make an impact on teaching, learning and assessment. As a result, the seven schools at the University of Huddersfield are running a number of projects and we are sharing some of the project progress and outcomes here on the Teaching and Learning Institute blog.

In the School of Education and Professional Development, a project on embedding critical writing into undergraduate courses was developed. This blog post was written by Jess Haigh, Subject Librarian at the University of Huddersfield who is part of the project team. In this post Jess presents her experiences with carrying out a pilot to create a resource to develop students’ resource searching skills.

Developing an online resource for resource searching skills

As part of the larger project, it was decided to create an educational resource that could be used in the classroom, or uploaded onto the VLE to be completed outside class time, which would have the learning outcomes of differentiating between keywords and non-keywords, demonstrate use of synonyms in context in searching and use these search skills to find more appropriate academic sources. I wanted students to feel more confident about searching the library catalogue. I was also interested in if and how they currently looking for help in searching library resources.

I developed an online resource using NearPod. http://www.NearPod.com is a platform for creating resources than can be either student or teacher led. Different licences allow you to do different things, but for a free trial I was able to create a series of activities that I predicted would take students around 10-15 minutes to complete on their own, including watching two short videos. These included drawing, filling in the blanks, and free typing activities. I found setting up this series of activities quite simple and the whole thing from start to finish took less than a working day. I also made the two videos using VideoScribe and Adobe Spark Video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLcUV3SYuH0 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RX2J1KXUs8A ).

I piloted this resource with a group of second year students. The students were fully informed about the purpose of the pilot, and signed consent forms. This was quite a useful exercise in and of itself, as they are about to go into planning research of their own for their Major Study, so I was able to demonstrate good ethical research practice to them. Students filled in a questionnaire including sliding scale questions on how confident they felt about searching the library catalogue and the internet, and open-ended questions about what they interpreted key words, synonyms and related terms as being, and if and how they would ask for help in the library. Students were then given as much time as needed to complete the NearPod exercises, using their own devices. Some students took less than ten minutes, but others took twenty-five, showing my original estimation of how long it would take to complete did not account for differentiation. I also observed some peer learning occurring throughout the exercises: it would be interesting to observe if that took place outside of a classroom environment. Students were then asked to fill in a second questionnaire identical to the first, to measure their learning, and to fill in some open-ended questions regarding their feelings towards the resource.

Enhancing student confidence in searching for information

Attitudes towards the resource itself were mostly positive, with students finding it “informative”, “helpful” and “useful”. There was only one negative response to the task, a student who felt it had not been worth coming to that class as they had done key word searching in their first year. The majority of students also felt more confident in searching the library catalogue after completing the resource, with 46% also feeling more confident in searching for information on the Internet.

What I found most interesting was students’ attitude to online learning. 44% said they would not have completed the task if it had been put on UniLearn, and 46% said they probably wouldn’t, with several citing a lack of time as their reason. It made me wonder how much effort is being put into creating online resources that will never be used by time-poor students who only go into learning spaces to complete specific tasks.

I will be looking further into these results, and adapting the resource according to some specific feedback. This will all feed into the larger project to encourage tutors to include exercises on finding good resources in class. I am also presenting on this project at the Librarian’s Information Literacy Annual Conference in April.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI). The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Dr Jess Power: 2016 National Teaching Fellow

Picture: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian Staff at the University of Huddersfield. PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Picture: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian
Staff at the University of Huddersfield.
PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Over the last six years, the Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI) has coordinated the University of Huddersfield’s internal National Teaching Fellowship selection process. We have worked closely with the Pro-Vice Chancellor of Teaching and Learning and a selection committee to identify and support colleagues to apply for National Teaching Fellowship Awards. The Higher Education Academy (HEA) in December announced that two colleagues were awarded National Teaching Fellowships.

In 2016 Dr Jess Power, Director of Teaching and Learning in the School of Art, Design and Architecture was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship. Jess is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, Member of the Chartered Management Institute and a Trustee of the Textile Institute. Her core discipline area is textiles/apparel and the main body of her research focuses around active learning for large cohorts of apparel/textile students. Jess has developed strategies which have led to a real impact on students learning by creating best practice models using active learning techniques and introducing approaches such as peer-learning and team-teaching.

Since joining the University in 2012 Jess has led a number of initiatives to transform the under-graduate student experience by embedding collaboration both within and out of the curriculum. Primarily focusing on encouraging students to work across and beyond disciplines to encourage the co-creation of knowledge and the development of networks. This has led to students broadening their interests and ambitions and improving skills relevant to industry, enterprise and employability.

Jess says:

“Throughout my teaching career I have aimed to find the right blend of surroundings and pedagogical theories to create supportive environments which bring together students and staff, from many disciplines, to engage in creating sustainable learning networks across Higher Education, commercial sectors and Professional Bodies.”

Interdisciplinarity projects: Honeypot and ICE

ICE, which stands for Innovation and Creative Exchange is a series of lectures, workshops, networking events and skill exchanges which is aimed at fostering collaboration between design and engineering students – the next generation of employees for UK knowledge based industries.

The aim is to bring the best of innovative design and industry thinking into the undergraduate curriculum and to embed the latest innovation and design methodologies. Events include design challenges, industrial briefs and visits from high-profile professionals; with a key focus of providing interdisciplinarity opportunities to work on real-world challenges such as the 24-hour challenges on ‘sustainable solutions to global challenges’, the ‘ageing population’ and the ‘internet of things’. The impact of ICE has been demonstrated through companies recruiting students, through further research projects, and five discipline-hopping interns (engineering student placed in a design company and vice-versa).

Through this structures Jess has created interdisciplinarity which has become firmly established; resulting in the showcasing and sharing of School-based resources and the further development of interdisciplinarity challenges and networking opportunities across the entire University. One of the outputs of this project was an Industry award-winning product design which has been further developed by an industrial partner. 

Technology focused initiatives

Jess has been involved in investigating Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) usage within the creative arts in a collaborative project between the School of Art, Design and Architecture and Music, Humanities and Media. The research showed that the VLE was integrated less into practice-based subjects with three main barriers being identified; technical ability, navigation and aesthetics.

As a result of this research a framework was developed and implemented which promoted a blended approach to integrating the VLE into creative practice, specifically targeting navigation, aesthetics and digital literacy. The impact on both the student and staff experience was evident and subsequently, engagement with the VLE in creative arts has risen dramatically.

Jess also initiated a technician-led Teaching and Learning enhancement week which showcased the innovative technology available within the School and opened up these facilities for collaborative research and T&L projects. This has resulted in the School overcoming many technology-based restrictions and has had far-reaching benefits for students’ learning and the continuing professional development of staff.

For more information about National Teaching Fellows at the University of Huddersfield, see the Teaching and Learning Institute’s web page.

The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Dr Jane Tobbell: 2016 National Teaching Fellow

Picture: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian Staff at the University of Huddersfield. PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Photo: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian
PICTURE TAKEN ON MONDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2016

Over the last six years, the Teaching and Learning Institute (TALI) has coordinated the University of Huddersfield’s internal National Teaching Fellowship selection process. We have worked closely with the Pro-Vice Chancellor of Teaching and Learning and a selection committee to identify and support colleagues to apply for National Teaching Fellowship Awards.

The Higher Education Academy (HEA) in December announced that two colleagues were awarded National Teaching Fellowships. Dr Jess Power and Dr Jane Tobbell are two of the 55 recipients of the 2016 National Teaching Fellowships. You can learn more about the 2016 National Teaching Fellows on the HEA NTF 2016 pages.  

This post highlights some of the work of one of the successful candidates, Dr Jane Tobbell. Dr Tobbell teaches and researches in the discipline of psychology and has worked at the University of Huddersfield since 2006. Jane became a University Teaching Fellow in 2013, a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2014 and leads a number of innovative teaching and learning projects. These include an exploration of inclusion/learning environments, peer mentoring, developing an integrated assessment and feedback policy for her School and her research in teaching and learning around transition.

Jane considers that excellence in teaching and learning emerges through interaction between students and teachers, where both are allowed to contribute to a mutually engaging learning relationship. She puts down the success of her approach to her focus on forging enabling learning relationships which allow students to rehearse and perfect academic practices and gives them confidence to perform to the best of their ability.

Working in partnership with students
Jane is currently working with student researchers to investigate what inclusion means to students. One approach was to harness the collective wisdom of existing students to help new students. The project involved placing white boards in common areas in the School and students are invited to offer advice to new students. This project has provided space for the student voice and has resulted in a range of advice from tips on budgeting to how to engage with the library. Over 100 students contributed their advice and this has been disseminated across the School. The participation of so many students enables the collection of data which will represent everybody in the School and so allow a depth and breadth of understanding of what it means to be included which will inform meaningful policy and procedures in the School

Jane is the University lead in implementing peer mentoring programmes for all students. Peer mentoring promotes partnership between students and staff and enhances learning relationships because it enables interaction outside the formal curriculum where staff have the power of assessment. Moreover, it encourages reflection on experience in both mentors and mentees and so improves performance. As part of this, Jane has designed and led training in peer mentoring skills and in collaboration with students produced a job description and job specification for peer mentors. Students were involved in designing the training, identifying the nature of the mentor-mentee relationship and recruiting mentees. In this scheme students are given power to change the learning environment.
Jane believes excellence is enabled through supportive policy and systems and so she has created an Assessment and Feedback Manifesto. The manifesto emerged from consultation with staff and students and gathered NSS and KIS data. A major obstacle identified was ensuring staff have sufficient time to provide the feedback students need. To address this module design now requires assessment and feedback to be integrated into the module. The National Student Survey results reflect the improvements made in assessment and feedback.

Developing teaching and learning excellence
As part of giving all staff the opportunity to reflect on teaching and learning, Jane runs monthly seminars for all University staff and postgraduate students. People are invited to present their teaching and learning projects and Jane then chairs wider discussions about how the ideas might be applied in different areas. A particularly stimulating one involved the purpose and process of ‘the lecture.’ There are many forums for staff to discuss and present their research but fewer opportunities to enable the exploration of teaching and learning activity despite the prominence of this in everybody’s workloads. The seminars have been identified by the School Teaching and Learning Committee as an important part of their teaching and learning strategy to develop excellence.

Researching transition as a process
In a more recent project, she has collected longitudinal data from students over the four years of their degree course. There is very little longitudinal data currently in the literature and in partnership with colleagues from two other HEIs they are analysing these data and preparing it for dissemination. The data allow an understanding of transition and beyond to emerge. In terms of understanding student learning for example, it is clear that students require ongoing, targeted support to acquire and enact academic practices. It fundamentally challenges assumptions that transition is a period between not knowing and knowing; rather it is a process which continues throughout the degree.

For more information about National Teaching Fellows at the University of Huddersfield, see the Teaching and Learning Institute’s web page.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute. The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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Approaches to developing students’ oral presentation skills

This blog post was written by Chris Ireland, Academic Skills Tutor in the Business School at the University of Huddersfield. In this post he presents his experiences with supporting students to improve their oral presentation skills. Chris is currently undertaking doctoral research in which a main objective is to ascertain which aspects of the approach described are seen by the most apprehensive students as contributing towards their development as presenters.

Illustration of student presenting

One of the aims of the first year Accountancy and Finance module Accountants in Organisations that I work on with John English is the development of key competencies which are demanded by professionally focussed employers but are also useful for study at university. One of these areas is oral communication and within this being able to deliver oral presentations. Over the years that the module has been delivered the approach taken to helping the students develop in the delivery of oral presentations has evolved as we have researched how best we can help the students improve in this area. One complication in the development of oral presentation skills concerns the levels of apprehension that students can feel towards such activities. This is of particular concern for those studying accountancy who are often reported as experiencing higher levels of apprehension towards oral communication than students studying other disciplines (see Aly & Islam, 2003; Byrne et al, 2012).

The high levels of apprehension can have a demotivating effect, preventing students from engaging in activities designed to help them learn. There is some evidence (see Hassall, et al, 2013) that a focus on improving students’ self-efficacy will help towards overcoming the high levels of apprehension and at the same time will contribute to towards their personal development in this area. The presentation activities incorporated in the module are designed to take this into account.

When the module was initiated ten years ago the intention was to provide the students with progressively more challenging presentation tasks. In doing so the module incorporates three group presentations beginning with a short simple project in the autumn and ending with a longer high stakes presentation in spring. This approach is designed to help students become accustomed to presenting to an audience, feel a sense of achievement and have time to practice by encouraging them to make appointments with the Business School’s Learning Development Group. The fact that the projects are prepared and delivered as groups is important as it takes advantage of the social element of learning which is key in supporting the most apprehensive and in encouraging groups to practice their presentations.

The presentations are delivered in class with those groups who are not presenting forming part of the audience, providing feedback and conducting a peer assessment for which they gain some credit towards the module. The structure of the feedback and assessment form encourages the students to focus on the presentations thus providing more purpose than if these elements were not included.

In the days that follow the students receive the feedback from both the tutors and the peers. The volume of feedback is considerable, given that it has been provided by up to twenty peers and two tutors.  The students are then encouraged to use this feedback along with their own experiences of presenting when writing reflections that are required after each activity.

All members of the cohort are encouraged to engage in these aspects. However, those who are most apprehensive about presenting are invited for a one-to-one discussion. Those eligible are determined by their score on the well-established Oral Communication questionnaire: the PRCA-24 which was devised by Professor James McCroskey in the 1970s. Given the complex nature of the sources of apprehension, individual discussions allow us to explore specific strategies that each of these apprehensive students might adopt as they progress through the course.

If you are interested in reading more you can access a number of presentations and articles.

Ireland, Chris (2016) Student oral presentations: developing the skills and reducing the apprehension. In: Proceedings of 10th International Technology, Education and Development Conference Valencia, Spain. 7-9 March, 2016. IATED (2016). IATED, Valencia, Spain, pp. 1474-1483. ISBN 978-84-608-5617-7

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute. The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

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‘Discover, dream, design and deliver’ curriculum design workshops

License: CC0 Public Domain. From http://pixabay.com/en/gears-rotation-into-each-other-94221/

License: CC0 Public Domain

This blog post was written by Dr Liz Bennett, Director of Teaching and Learning in the School of Education and Professional Development and Dr Sue Folley, Academic Developer with a focus on the use of digital tools within teaching.

In this post they present their approach to curriculum design using appreciative inquiry and share the tools they have developed. University of Huddersfield colleagues can contact Liz and Sue if they want them to run a workshop.

The workshops are for colleagues at the University of Huddersfield who want to improve an aspect of their curriculum. They workshops can be adapted to a relevant theme or have a specific focus. Currently, we have worked with colleague to address the following areas:

  • employability
  • retention
  • attainment
  • students’ digital capability

We have developed a series of D4 Workshops to help Course Teams develop aspects of the curriculum. The workshop are designed around an Appreciative Inquiry model of change management which frames change in a positive way using a four stage process: Discover, Dream, Design, Deliver (Fifolt & Lander 2013).

All D4 Workshops have a time efficient starting point for the discussion, providing teams with tools to use as part of the ongoing process of curriculum review. They help to stimulate discussions amongst the course team in order to identify and address issues many of which are cross curricula. They are also:

  • positively framed (based on the appreciative inquiry approach);
  • practical and experiential (workshops are focused on four tasks relating to the discover, dream, design deliver stages of the appreciative inquiry model);
  • action-orientated (the deliver stage is about action planning).

The D4 Workshop resources can be found at http://ipark.hud.ac.uk/content/training-development. The evaluation of the workshops has shown that the approach is extremely valuable to the course teams providing them with tools to aid their thinking and a focus and forum for the curriculum review process. (The direct impact on students is harder to measure as the changes that arise are embedded in the curriculum).

Quote from participant:

“It created a space and structure for us to think clearly and practically about how to enhance our curriculum and pedagogy to respond to TEF whist not losing sight of the intrinsic value of education…It facilitated us to come up with a clear and focused ‘to do’ list….It made us aware that some small changes to teaching delivery could have a big impact if handled well”

Reference

Fifolt, M., & Lander, L. (2013). Cultivating Change Using Appreciative Inquiry. New Directions for Student Services, 2013(143), 19-30. doi:10.1002/ss.20056

Posted by Kathrine Jensen, Research Assistant, Teaching and Learning Institute. The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning. Follow TALI on Twitter

Posted in academic practice, Learning design, pedagogy, Research, Teaching, Training | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment