Academics networking online

Spring flowers

Photo credit Kathrine S. H. Jensen

Now that Spring is almost here (although I did see frost on the grass this morning) and all things start to come out from their Winter hide-away, perhaps it is time to consider making better use of social networking for research? Time to become more visible, to have a profile and to follow the work of other researchers in your field of interest. For Academics at University of Huddersfield one good way to start is to add your work to the University of Huddersfield Repository.

In a newsletter called Research Trends, Sarah Hugget writes about how academics and researchers are increasingly using and showing interest in social networking sites as places to look for potential collaborators, share and discuss ideas and – of course – create career enhancing (fingers crossed) profiles. She argues that the need to work globally and across disciplines is driving this development. Read the full article about Social networking in academia

For example, a site like academia.edu greats you with the message that thousands of academics use it every day and that this includes Stephen Hawking, Richard Dawkins, Paul Krugman and Noam Chomsky.

Another example of this is the community space, Methodspace, set up by the publisher SAGE. This looks like a ning community where you create your own profile page, you can join a variety of groups, ranging from subject specific “Research in education” to method specific “Narrative Research”.

A site like Philpapers, a directory of online philosophical articles and books by academic philosophers, also has discussion forums

I am sure there are many more examples of networks in all fields that will be useful.

Kathrine (click for my academia.edu profile)

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About talintuoh

Supporting and connecting colleagues to develop inspiring and innovative teaching and learning
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2 Responses to Academics networking online

  1. Pingback: New modes of research – the use of web 2.0 tools for research | Teaching and Learning Institute

  2. Larae says:

    I love it when people come together and share opinions.
    Great site, continue the good work!

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