Using a business simulation game to embed enterprise education

At the University of Huddersfield, we are exploring the benefits of using a business simulation game to embed enterprise education in teaching and learning. SimVenture is now available and ready to use across campus as part of a strategic teaching and learning project proposed by Dr. Kelly Smith, Head of Enterprise, and supported by the Teaching and Learning Institute.

Increasingly, enterprise and entrepreneurial skills are being seen as having wider relevance than simply business start-up with a separation of enterprise education and entrepreneurship education, and recommendations that both are contextualised and adapted to the needs of individual subjects through embedding in the subject-specific experience, rather than offered as generic ‘one size fits all’ modules (e.g. QAA 2012[1], Wilson 2012[2]).

SimVenture is a business simulation game launched in 2006 and used in over 150 HEIs all over the world. It is also used in schools, FE, and in communities including in several African countries with strong Government support.

As part of this project we are keen to research how SimVenture has been used at other Universities and aim to develop case studies based on the findings to provide inspiration or examples of practice for lecturers to use or adapt for their own needs. From an initial literature review we have identified a number of academics who has used or is using SimVenture with students and we are in the process of conducting interviews.

The project team also designed a survey on the use of computer based business simulation which is currently live. If you can contribute to the survey please click the link: https://www.survey.bris.ac.uk/hud/bsimulation

The outcomes and case studies will be made available to the sector. More details can be found at: http://www.hud.ac.uk/tali/projects/sp_enterprise/

References:

[1] http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/enterprise-guidance.pdf

[2] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/business-university-collaboration-the-wilson-review

Posted by Kathrine Jensen (@kshjensen)

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Call for Papers: Exploring staff and student partnerships

The Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change is a peer-reviewed cross-disciplinary research journal that welcomes contributions relating to staff and students as change agents. The journal is part of the UK Change Agents Network and aims to support research into partnerships between staff and students that identify, lead and deliver change in education across all disciplines. Follow them on twitter @CANagogy

Deadline 20th October 2014

Contributions from all members of UK Higher and Further Education institutions are welcome, including: (1) academic staff, (2) students, (3) professional and support staff (4) NUS Sabbatical Officers and members (5) professional bodies/employers and (6) recent alumni. We accept a range of submissions from traditional research articles, case studies and project reports to shorter opinion pieces, book reviews and technology reviews.

Co-authored submissions from staff and students are especially welcomes. All published student authored submissions will be entered into a competition whereby one will be awarded a prize for excellence of up to £500.

  • Opinion Pieces – short and thought provoking, stating an opinion and drawing on evidence to support it (a maximum of 750 words with around 3 references).
  • Case Studies / Project reports- based on staff and students working in partnership to identify and deliver change, typically describing: the organisational and historical context, specifications of the project, discussion of pedagogy/practice, implementation, evaluation and lessons learnt (a maximum of 3000 words with around 6 references).
  • Research Articles – longer papers, providing a clear rationale for the study within the body of published research, an overview of the research methodology adopted, a presentation of findings, and a discussion of those findings in relation to existing knowledge (a maximum of 6000 words with around 10 references).
  • Book Reviews – a critical overview of a book related to educational innovation and change involving staff and students (a maximum of 750 words).
  • Technology Reviews – a critique or review of a technology, outlining its application for learning and teaching and its strengths and weaknesses (a maximum of 1000 words, with around 3 references).

(Text copied from the journal homepage)

Posted by Kathrine Jensen (@kshjensen)

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Call for papers: Digital Technologies special edition of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education

Digital technologies are pervasive in every aspect of Higher Education, and though their use is undoubtedly common in learning development activities, this field is under reported as an area of expertise.

Call for papers, July 2014: Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education (JLDHE) Special Edition 2014, Digital Technologies in Learning Development

Deadline for submission: 15th September 2014

Publication: November 2014

The November 2014 issue of the JLDHE will focus on ways in which digital technologies are used in the work of learning developers, academic teaching staff or other practitioners seeking to improve student learning. This focus has been chosen because of the large number of technology-related submissions we receive.

This call is for academic papers, case studies and opinion pieces. These might relate to projects, development activities, research or innovative practice that consider the interaction between learning development practices and digital technologies.

To submit your paper or to see the current edition of the JLDHE click here

Guidelines for authors are also available at the journal website.

(Text copied from ALDinHE journal site)

Posted by Kathrine Jensen

@kshjensen

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Teaching Large Groups: a Higher Education Academy Toolkit

Large Group Teaching is one of of the ‘New to teaching toolkits’ developed by the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and well worth taking a look at as it talks about student-centered teaching, design and interaction. There are also some really useful teaching tips.

Tour de France peloton 2014 by @kshjensen

Tour de France peloton 2014 by @kshjensen

Large Group Teaching (LGT) strand of the New to Teaching Toolkit explores some of the practical strategies that can be of assistance in making LGT a rewarding and engaging experience for all concerned.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen (@kshjensen)

Posted in Learning design, pedagogy, Teaching, Training, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

2014 HEA Conference Highlights

I was at the Higher Education Academy (HEA) Annual Conference held at Aston University in Birmingham last week. The event marked the tenth anniversary of the organisation.

Here are highlights from some of conference sessions I attended:

Working together for future employability – an employer’s perspective

Keynote,  Morrison, HEA

Anne Morrison, Director of BBC Academy (the BBC’s organisational training centre), mentioned during her opening keynote that the BBC Academy uses Twitter to conduct staff development master classes. This is to enable BBC employees interact and engage with industry experts via a Q&A format.

I found this interesting and I would like to explore the use of social media tools like Twitter and Yammer as means of conducting staff development at the University of Huddersfield.

How to share good practice with busy academics across a large university

Kelly, HEAKieran Kelly and a small team of AV staff member identify and film academics at the University of the West of England (UWE) who wish to share their good teaching and learning practices. These videos are hosted on an internal portal for other UWE staff members to watch. There are currently 37 videos and the site gets about 39 unique visitors per day during the academic semester. Kieran stated that it takes about 2-3 days to record and edit the video resources. The issue of scalability was raised during this session’s Q&A.

I believe a way to get round the scalability issue and the cost of creating these video resources is to curate them instead. There are already many innovative teaching and learning video resources available for free on Youtube and Vimeo which could be curated for time-poor academics.

Digital development – experiences offering staff development using the student’s online learning environment.

Robson, HEA

 

Linda Robson and Rehana Awan reported on a pilot project at the Open University (OU) which conducted a staff development conference using asynchronous online communication. A decision was taken to convert the poorly attended staff development face-to-face conference into an asynchronous online conference. The conference keynote was recorded and uploaded on to the Moodle platform. OU colleagues who were selected to be conference presenters were asked to created 7 minute long screencasts which were also uploaded on to the Moodle conference site. These contributors responded to the comments and questions posted by online conference delegates in response to their screencasts. The initial conference feedback has been positive and there are plans to continue with this asynchronous format.

Establishing global connections to engage international students: lessons learned from an academic writing MOOC.

Wilding and Watkins, HEAElisabeth Wilding and Sebastian Watkins from the University of Reading shared their experiences of running an academic MOOC on the FutureLearn platform. This MOOC was aimed at international students and there were participants from over 140 countries. 60% of the MOOC participants had no prior online course engagement before enrolling on the course. Survey results revealed that participants’ interaction with peers and discussing things online with other learners scored low on the survey while learning new things and watching videos were popular. The Reading team plans to use the lessons derived from the MOOC to launch a SPOC (Small Private Online Community) next academic year.

I suspect that SPOC will be the next HE buzz word in 2014/15.

Post by Ola Aiyegbayo

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Inclusive Assessment in Practice – CALL FOR ABSTRACTS by 22nd August

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When: Monday 24th November 2014

Where: Hosted at Plymouth University

Cost: Please note that while the conference is free to attend (lunch and refreshments provided), delegates are required to book and pay for their own travel and accommodation.

This one day conference, hosted by the Pedagogic Research Institute and Observatory in partnership with the HE Academy, will provide a forum to discuss and share the experience of academics and practitioners in inclusive assessment. The call welcomes abstracts for workshops (60-90 minutes), papers (20 minutes) and posters that offer insights into inclusive assessment in, and across, all disciplines. Abstracts (500 words maximum) are sought that address key themes shown below:

  • Changing the culture of assessment to be inclusive
  • Inclusive assessment design and delivery in the disciplines
  • Enhanced learning from assessment: feed-in, feed-forward and feedback

For more information about the conference and to submit an abstract online click here.

I saw this call in the June Higher Education Academy newsletter.

Posted by Kathrine Jensen (@kshjensen)

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Building our learning cultures: Putting the Teaching and Learning Strategy into practice

Yesterday was the 9th University of Huddersfield Teaching and Learning Conference, we had a serious number of colleagues booked to attend (about 175). Every year the Teaching and Learning Institute team, the staff development group and a steering group with representation from all the Schools in the University have the responsibility of developing this event where colleagues can network, share practice and learn about what is happening across the University.

2014 Teaching and Learning Conference

The day went really well and this was down to all the planning, checking and double-checking of sessions, rooms, food, booking and all those details that go into making a successful event.

Professor Tim Thornton opened the conference by talking about the many achievements in teaching and learning that we have seen this past academic year.

 

University of Huddersfield award winners 2014Then we heard from James Ritchie and Dawn Bagnall, two University of Huddersfield students, and they talked about the Student Teaching and Learning Consultant Scheme. This scheme has been running for the last two years and is all about promoting student and staff working together to develop student engagement, the learning experience and promote conversations about teaching and learning

Strategic Teaching and Learning Projects

Before lunch we heard from four ongoing strategic teaching and learning projects:

In the afternoon, delegates went to workshops or presentations of their choice.

Thank you to everyone who came and contributed to such a fantastic day!

posted by Kathrine Jensen (@kshjensen)

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